Category Archives: Travel

The art of queueing up

Living as an expat is a culturally rich experience. It makes you aware of a lot of things that you never thought existed. Learning about a new culture opens a gate to yet another horizon that remains to be explored. While traveling for few days to a new country in itself can be a life enriching experience, living in another country offers an ocean of things to learn from. It gives us an opportunity to become curious kids again and perceive new things as we grow up in a foreign land all over again. How we deal and cope with this new culture, change in taste and environment allows us to test our personality in many ways. At times, it can be frustrating to tackle homesickness, loneliness and that feeling of feeling out of place but in the end we come out being stronger and full of knowledge.

There are so many things I have learned after coming to Bangkok that I never gave any thought to before coming here. Today I want to talk about the most basic thing that I have learned(re-learned) after coming to Bangkok and that is “to wait for my turn” or “to queue up” or “to be patient”. It is very simple and straight forward trait. Being patient saves us from many agonies in life and makes life much easier. Its not that I never knew about waiting in a line or queuing up. Right from my early school days, I was taught to stand in a line and wait for my turn. But somewhere in the transition from being a student to a grown up person, I had lost this trait.

My first reminder to it began when I was attending classes for my Master’s Degree. All graduate students would stand in a line to get inside the classroom. To me, it was a funny sight. I sure had stood in lines to get inside the classroom but that was way back in the primary school. But soon I learned that not waiting for my turn was not a cool thing and slowly I got accustomed to this habit of standing in a line wherever I went around in the city of Bangkok. Let me sight few examples of it.

If it is late in the evening and there are many people waiting for a public van to get back to home, in Bangkok you patiently wait in a line until the van comes. If the number of people standing in the line is way more than the number of people that can fit in a van, no problem…there will be a next van or you might have to think of an alternative way to get back home but never ever you will find anyone rushing or pushing each other to get in the van. The same rule applies while waiting for a taxi outside a shopping mall.

Street food is awesome in Bangkok, we all know this. There are several popular vendors in streets of Bangkok that are very famous and is always crowded. So how do you order food here? Its simple, stand in a queue and wait for your turn. In some places there will be a pen and a paper, you write down your order in it and wait for your food to be cooked while you drink beer. You will not hear any shouting or loud inquiries like, “is my food done yet?”. People just quietly wait.

There are numerous places where this rule applies like while buying a train ticket, buying a bus ticket, waiting to get in the train/bus, withdrawing money from ATM, public restrooms and so on. This must be common in many countries.

Siam Paragon is one of the biggest shopping mall in the heart of Bangkok. It sells products from all over the world. One day while we were in Siam Paragon, we saw a queue in front of Louis Vuitton store, many people were waiting to get inside the store. I had never in my life seen people queue up to get inside a luxury store on a normal day. It wasn’t the day of a big sale or a day of new arrivals. It was just a normal weekend. Also not to mention I have seen people queue up to buy fruits/stuffs from a local street market as well.

Whenever I think about government offices in Asia, the first thing that comes to my mind is chaos. I have been to the immigration office and Department of Labour in Thailand and it is the most organised government office I have ever seen. The first thing I noticed is that it was clean and quiet. Here too, people would queue up to get their job done. I saw no middle men, no chaos and the work was done smoothly and in order.

The reason I am talking so elaborately about queuing up is that last wednesday, we went out for dinner. The place we wanted to go was across the street of the place we got down. So, in order to get there we had to cross this overhead bridge. It was an old overhead bridge and narrower than the new ones. The street was a bit crowded than usual, I hurriedly went ahead to climb the stairs only to realise that people were waiting in queue to use the overhead bridge in order to cross the road. I was surprised! And not to mention the queue was around 50 meters long! This city successfully and pleasantly surprised me once again for its ability to queue up 🙂

Do you guys have any stories to share regarding queueing up? Would love to hear them.

13 Comments

Filed under Culture, expat life, ramblings, Travel

Halong Bay Vietnam

Traveling to Ha Long Bay has been on my list since last year. It was one of my must go places. So earlier this month we finally went there. Ha Long Bay is in Northeast Vietnam and listed in UNESCO world heritage site. It is also said to be a new addition to the 7 natural wonders of the world.

Since we had only 4 days and 3 nights to spare, we went straight to Hanoi as a stop to visit Ha Long Bay. Our plan was to stay for a night at Hanoi then go to Ha Long Bay, stay there a night and then come back to Hanoi stay there for a night and back to Bangkok. As we approached the date, there was an unfortunate news of a possible storm at Ha Long Bay that would last for a few days and the storm was scheduled to arrive on the day we landed at Hanoi :(.

I was very disheartened of this news but nevertheless we kept our hopes high and boarded the flight. The day we landed on Hanoi was a pleasant day. It was sunny and warm. As soon as we reached our hotel we inquired about the possibility of going to Ha Long Bay the next day but they said all the cruises to Ha Long Bay had been cancelled and it was impossible to go there the following day even for a day trip. Knowing this we went out to explore Hanoi. There we decided to check with a travel agent anyway. On inquiring, she suggested us to book a day trip for day after tomorrow and hope that it doesn’t rain that day and that is exactly what we did :). And when day after tomorrow arrived, much to our delight there was no rain and it was a warm and sunny day.

We had booked a day trip to Ha Long Bay from Hanoi. A bus came to pick us up at the hotel at 8 am. It was a 4 hours ride from Hanoi. Once we reached the port, the guide gave us tickets to one of the cute Chinese wooden boats.

Chinese style wooden boats.

Chinese style wooden boats.

At first, the bay looked like any other bay but as we went farther, we could see the limestone hills on the sea. Even when looking from a distance, it looked mysterious and ethereal. As we went deeper inside, there were numerous hills on the sea. It was beautiful, in fact it was the most spectacular view. Everyone in the boat was in the top decker by now to take pictures and enjoy the view.

Amazing Ha Long Bay with all its glory!

Amazing Ha Long Bay with all its glory! And it was still a little cloudy.

After that lunch was served on the boat and it was very disappointing :P. After lunch, the boat took us to an entrance to the lagoon. We had to go through a water cave to enter the lagoon. We were lucky that day as it was a low tide and the entrance was open. It was a paradise in the middle of the sea, a calm water surrounded by those beautiful limestone hills.

Spectacular Ha Long Bay, you can see the tiny entrance to the Lagoon.

Spectacular Ha Long Bay, you can see the tiny entrance to the Lagoon.

A cave entrance to the lagoon.

A cave entrance to the lagoon.

The Lagoon!

The Lagoon!

After that we saw an ancient civilization of people who lived on water and it was called a floating village. They even had a school on the sea!

The floating village, an ode to the ancient civilization.

The floating village, an ode to the ancient civilization.

Once we came back from the lagoon and the floating village, the guide informed us that our trip was almost over and we would stop over to a cave before we return. A and I were very happy to have made it there despite the weather forecast.

Then as we returned, the guide told us that we go to see this cave and then we take another route out. I had no idea what this cave was all about. Also I had done very less research before the trip and honestly all I was excited about was Ha Long Bay!

But as we entered the cave, I was dumbstruck with the beauty of the cave. It was one of the stalagmite and stalactites caves and it was a huge cave with all sorts of natural carvings inside the wall of the cave.

The most amazing stalagmite cave, it left me breathless!

The most amazing stalagmite cave, it left me breathless!

I had never ever seen such a spectacular thing in my life; it was a gift of mother nature. As it turns out the huge limestone hills on Ha Long Bay were hollow from inside and long time ago there was water inside the hills but now the water was gone leaving behind beautiful impressions of the waves.

Inside the cave

Inside the cave

I felt almost spiritual inside the cave and I even imagined it to be one of the caves of ancient hindu times where Yogis and Munis meditated to attain moksha :). It was so peaceful and cool there, we didn’t feel like coming out.

Simply amazing!

A mini waterfall, simply amazing!

We spent almost over an hour roaming around the cave and admiring its beauty. The guide explained that until a decade ago, this cave was not recognized world wide but now it was listed in the world heritage site and it deserved every bit of recognition. The inside of the caves were lighted with carefully placed artificial lights that revealed the beautiful stone carvings which were formed naturally over the years.

Peek a boo!

Peek a boo!

This trip was worth every Vietnamese Dong we spent getting there and I am so glad to have been to Ha Long Bay especially the Dau Go Cave(I found the name later). Leaving you with some pictures. This is a must go place and highly recommended by me for everyone. I leave you with a short video I took from my phone.

10 Comments

Filed under Travel

A peek into the local Thai market- A photo blog

We live in outskirts of Bangkok and we do not have a lot of supermarkets in this area. So, every Wednesdays and Sundays there is a huge market where locals sell stuff like meat, vegetables, food, clothes and what not. We buy our vegetables and fish from this market since it is more fresh than the supermarket and its cheaper too. Thailand is famous for its street food. On this market too, we can see lots of stalls selling local Thai food. Its pretty convenient to buy food there for people who don’t want to cook at home.

So, in this post I’m sharing with you the pictures from the market taken with my phone. The market is quite vibrant and definitely worth a share :).

Motorcycle taxi ride to the market, costs around 20 Baht

Motorcycle taxi ride to the market, costs around 20 Baht

Tropical fruit Rambudan right at the entrance

Tropical fruit Rambudan right at the entrance

Market entrance

Market entrance

Thai/Chinese style pork

Thai/Chinese style pork

Famous Thai pork and rice balls with sweet and sour sauce

Famous Thai pork and rice balls with sweet and sour sauce

Tropical fruit, I don't know its name 40 Baht per kilo

Tropical fruit, I don’t know its name 40 Baht per kilo

A very sour Thai fruit used to make sweet and sour salad, sorry for thw blurry pic :)

A very sour Thai fruit used to make sweet and sour salad, sorry for thw blurry pic 🙂

Local Deli

Local Deli

Some kind of spicy soup with mushroom

Some kind of spicy soup with mushroom

You can buy some lottery too...

You can buy some lottery too…

A drink stall, very famous in Thailand...you can find similar stalls in each and every corner.

A drink stall, very famous in Thailand…you can find similar stalls in each and every corner.

Thai curries with steam rice ready to take away

Thai curries with steam rice ready to take away

Pork BBQ

Pork BBQ

Fried fish

Fried fish

Some kind of salad

Some kind of salad

You can find SIM cards too

You can find SIM cards too

And shoes as well for 100 Baht per pair

And shoes as well for 100 Baht per pair

Our favorite stall, all kinds of seasonal greens are found here.

Our favorite stall, all kinds of seasonal greens are found here.

A's favorite stall which sells onion and garlic

A’s favorite stall which sells onion and garlic

Durian Durian

Durian Durian

Fruits

Fruits

Fruits

Fruits

More fruits

More fruits

Clams and shells

Clams and shells

Boiled veggies with different kinds of spicy sauces.

Boiled veggies with different kinds of spicy sauces.

Steamed, fried fish ready to eat along with omelet

Steamed, fried fish ready to eat along with omelet

These tiny shrimps were still alive!

These tiny shrimps were still alive!

Fried eggs with two yolks

Fried eggs with two yolks

In case you feel sunny ;)

In case you feel sunny 😉

Thai sausage

Thai sausage

Thai steamed red curry

Thai steamed red curry

Local pizza

Local pizza

Charcoal grilled whole chicken

Charcoal grilled whole chicken

Thai dessert

Thai dessert

Fresh seafood

Fresh seafood

A flower stall

A flower stall

Grilled mackerel

Grilled mackerel

Steamed mackerel?

Steamed mackerel?

Find me!:)

Find me!:)

Inside the market

Inside the market

Fried pork or Moo Crob in Thai

Fried pork or Moo Crob in Thai

Red Snapper grilled with seasalt

Red Snapper grilled with seasalt

A must have Thai ingredient.

A must have Thai ingredient.

Steamed crab

Steamed crab

Local version of KFC :)

Local version of KFC 🙂

Fried crickets :)

Fried crickets 🙂

Thai Northern style sausage

Thai Northern style sausage

fried pork skin, sorry for the blurred pic!

fried pork skin, sorry for the blurred pic!

End of the market!

End of the market!

I hope you all enjoyed going through the pictures :).

19 Comments

Filed under Culture, Food, Thai Food, Travel

A travel tale

Travellers are full of stories. Everytime we visit a new place, we see and learn new things and who doesn’t like to share unique experiences? We all do in one way or another. I love talking to my grandparents to hear about their experiences, it gives me an opportunity to peek into the historic era they lived in. Unfortunately, I never talked with Baajya about his travel tales when he was in this world(and I don’t know why). But whenever I am with my Hajur Bua, I pester him to tell me about his travel tales.

One of the things I’m most interested in knowing is about his journey from  my ancestral home in Dhading district to Kathmandu, which took several days to complete during those times. I have asked him many times to tell me about his journey from Dhading to Kathmandu and every time I listen to this story, it amazes me more and more.

My Jiju Bua, married his eldest daughter to a scholar in Kathmandu. After Thulo Fufu was married, it opened a door for my Hajur Bua to travel to Kathmandu. During those days, it was very common to send your children to stay at your relatives’ place to study. So, Jiju Bua sent Hajur Bua to study in Kathmandu city as the only modern school in Nepal was located in Kathmandu(Durbar High School).

The journey from Dhading to Kathmandu was made on foot. Usually a bunch of people who had to go to the city waited for a convenient time so that they all could travel together in a group. These people were traders who brought in everyday commodity to the village, students who studied in the city or people who travelled to visit their relatives in the city. A journey would typically start by Juju Muwa putting tika on Hajur Bua’s forehead and blessing him for the successful completion of the journey. Hajur Bua said that she would also pack a small bag of rice, a bottle of ghee and some dried vegetables for the journey. They would start from the hilltop and descend downwards to catch a road that would connect them to the capital city. I don’t exactly know if it was a “road” or just a walking trail because every time I ask Hajur Bua to describe the road, he would say it is not remotely close to the present day highway but it was a well establish trail which the traders and travellers would use frequently to travel from India and other parts of Nepal to the capital city. The descent from the hill was mostly the famous hilly terrain of Nepal in Dhading district. If they start the journey in the morning, by evening they would reach the lowlands which is called “Besi” in Nepali. They would have to spend the night at the Besi as travelling during night time was not possible. On this Hajur Bua said that during those days, it was very important to reach Besi before the sunset as there would be fear of wild animals after the sunset. On reaching Besi, they would request for “Bass” or shelter to the village people at Besi. The travelling group would then borrow utensils from  them, fetch firewoods in the nearby forest and prepare their meals of rice, ghee and dried vegetables like Gundruk that they have brought along with them. I asked Hajur Bua if the village people asked anything in return for staying at their house, to this he said, they would leave the remaining rice/ghee if the journey was of one night and if not they would give a portion of the commodities to them. I was truly moved by this system based on understanding and basic human instinct of helping each other.

I also inquired if there were any robbers or if they were scared of anything while travelling. On this Hajur Bua smiled and said we didn’t know of anything called as robbery, the fact that one person could rob another person was alien to the people of Gaun and Besi(village and lowland). At this point, both me and Hajur Bua drifted into the conversation of how the people of Nepal have changed over time. Then he giggled slightly and said, there was no fear of one human harming another human but we were scared of Ghosts and Monsters. There were several stories of fire monsters who walked on forest after sunset called “Raken Bhoot” and some other monsters that he talked about which I do not re-call at this point. I slightly teased Hajur Bua and asked if he believed if they existed. On this he said smiling, I don’t know if I believed in them or not but our elders always shared stories of how they encountered certain Monsters and he was definitely scared of them then.

Going back to the journey, after spending the night at Besi, they would set off early at dawn and head to the capital city. It would take whole day for them to reach the main road that would link them directly to Kathmandu. Again, they would take shelter in some village, cook their food and spend the night there. The next day, they would start their journey early in the morning. On this day, they would meet many travellers/traders going towards Kathmandu. Most of them would be carrying different kinds of goods from India. Hajur Bua said with excitement, they even carried vehicles in large wooden logs during those times! Then he continued, the last few hours of the journey were the toughest as they had to cross several hills before they could enter the Kathmandu valley. Some would fall sick and they would find people resting as some of them had walked for many days at this point. Then by the evening of this day, they would reach Kathmandu valley crossing many hills and forests. And this is how my Hajur Bua came to the capital city to study. He further said that Kathmandu valley was nothing like what it is today. There was very less population in the valley and places like Maharajgunj and Kamaladi was a forest. Since Thulo Fufu’s house was in Thamel, he stayed there for some years to study at Durbar High School. Next time I visit Hajur Bua, I will surely asked him to tell me the story about his life in Kathmandu during those days :).

I love spending time with Hajur Bua to hear about many of his simple yet profound experiences of his times. I think my Hajur Bua was around 14-15 years old when he made this journey to the capital city on foot. After the story, he would say, how times have changed now and how everything is so convenient these days.

I leave you with this picture of Gorkha hills from the Facebook page “Ancient Nepal” and leave the rest to your imagination!!:)

Hills of Gurkha in ancient times, picture courtesy Facebook Page of "Ancient Nepal"

Hills of Gurkha in ancient times, picture courtesy Facebook Page of “Ancient Nepal”

Reference of characters:

Jiju Bua: My Dad’s grandfather
Jiju Muwa: My Dad’s Grandmother
Hajur Bua: My grandfather(Dad’s Dad)
Baajya: Maternal Grandfather
Thulo Fufu: My Dad’s Aunt/Hajur Bua’s eldest sister

10 Comments

Filed under Culture, Life, ramblings, Travel

A Japanese tourist with Indian wife

Has anyone ever mistaken your country of origin. It happens with me and my husband(yes A and I got married in Feb :D) all the time.

I am usually mistaken for an Indian which does not make me so happy because I want to be identified as a Nepali. On the other hand A is identified as a citizen of whichever country he visits. For example, here in Thailand, everyone says he looks like a Thai. As A knows a bit of Thai language, people always think he is Thai. Last year, we went to Cambodia and they thought A was Cambodian. A says when he went to Malaysia, he was mistaken for a Malay and the same thing happened in China, Singapore and other surrounding Asian countries.

But the strangest thing is we didn’t think we would be mistaken for our country of origin in our own motherland, Nepal. After our week long wedding, A and I went to visit different temples in Kathmandu. As A is from Patan area, he took me to all the temples near Patan Durbar Square. One of the most famous and beautiful temple in Patan Durbar Square is Krishna Mandir. I know this is ridiculous, but I had never been inside Krishna Mandir before so A really wanted to take me inside the temple for a darshan. So, we were walking around Patan Durbar Square taking pictures and visiting temples. As we approached near Krishna Mandir, A took several pictures of me outside the temple and after that we climbed up the stairs to enter the main temple where there is a century old statue of Lord Krishna. In Kathmandu, many hindu temples does not allow non-hindus to enter the temple. So, when A climbed up the stairs, the pujari at Krishna Mandir stopped A saying Japanese are not allowed inside the temple! Hearing this both A and I burst into laughter. Then he talked to the pujari in Newari saying, “I am Nepali and I have spent my childhood roaming around this temple”, which clearly astonished him and he was a little embarrassed too. After this the pujari said,”I thought you were a Japanese tourist with an Indian wife!”

Krishna Mandir at Patan

Krishna Mandir at Patan

So, this was our story at the Krishna Mandir. Has anything similar happened to you guys as well? I would love to hear such stories.

11 Comments

Filed under Culture, Travel

Dhunga khojda deuta vetiyo(Mexican food joint in Bangkok)

There is a saying in Nepali, “Dhunga khojda deuta vetiyo”, which literally translates to, when I went looking for stone, I found god. Although the meaning of this saying is deep and profound, we use it in our daily lives too. Something similar happened to me during this weekend, dhunga khojda deuta vetiyo. We went looking for a normal shop and we found a great place to eat :).

A and I were out for shopping trying to find one particular shop in Bangkok. By the time we reached the place, we were already hungry but we had to go for dinner with friends in less than two hours. This meant we could grab something to snack before dinner. Then by the same building where this shop was, we saw a small outlet where few tourists were merrily eating. We went in to check what it was. It was a mexican food joint. I like Mexican food, but I hadn’t tried it many times to judge how it really was. I had been to few places that served Mexican food while in C city. In Bangkok, we had been to Sunrise Tacos which is like a Mexican fast food chain and the food is okish, not too good and not too bad.

But there was something special about this little place. The pictures in the menu looked yummy and there were more than one thing that we wanted to order, but since we had to go to this dinner in the evening, we decided to order some light starters and a drink.

I ordered a snack size Quesadilla and A ordered corn chips with Guacamole dip and Mexican chicken wings.

Quesadilla

The Quesadilla was amazing. The chicken was grilled and juicy, it had red beans, cheese and capsicum filling. Each bite was juicy and succulent. And next was Corn chips with Guacamole dip. Guacamole salsa is my favourite dip in the whole wide world, I often make it at home. But whenever we ordered this in some restaurants either the portion was very small or it was mixed with mayo, which we didn’t prefer. But this dip was perfect at this place. It was a bit different from what I usually make, this might be because I had never tried the traditional Guacamole before and I tend to put more lemon. Also the portion at this place was good, we got a bowl full of Guacamole and basket full of chips for 160Baht, which is not bad at all.

Corn chips with Guacamole, I couldn’t wait so took the pic after first few bites 🙂

The chicken wings was also good, it had a nice tomato sauce and dried fish on top of it which made the taste unique (same as the newark golbheda ko achar/tomato sauce with dried fish). I had Mexican strawberry/kiwi soda to go with the food, which I expected to be as good as the Ranjana galli soda that we get in Kathmandu but it was not as good.

Chicken wings with fish and tomato sauce

Our overall experience at the restaurant was very good. We were pleasantly surprised, it also had a free salsa bar from where you could select salsa for of your choice to go with the food. The only thing that I didn’t like about the place were the bench. It was not comfortable at all. It had a hard wooden bench and table kind of setting which is not too uncomfortable given that the restaurant does not come cheap.

La Monita

If any of you are in Bangkok or planning to visit Bangkok and want to try Mexican food, you can visit this place. The address is:
La Monita,
Mahatun Plaza, Ploenchit Road,
Ploenchit BST Station

13 Comments

Filed under Food, Travel

Delhi Belly- Lajpat Nagar and Beyond

The second day schedule was hectic and filled with places to shop. Delhi is a big city with unpredictable traffic, so going from one place to another can take a lot of time. We had only two days to tick our long list of good to buy at Delhi, so we started our day early. We had quick breakfast at the guest house and headed towards Lajpat Nagar, our shopping destination for the day.

We decided to take metro to go to Lajpat Nagar central market, it took us around one hour to get there. After we got down from metro, again we took rickshaw to go to the central market. But unlike Karol Bagh, Lajpat Nagar is huge. There were all kinds of small colorful shops in the central market displaying dupattas, shoes, bangles, kurtis, sarees and many more. We needed to buy a lot of sarees so were looking for one place to buy most of it. As we wandered from one alley no another, we couldn’t find a decent saree shop. It was hot and sunny that day and I started to get frustrated as I hadn’t even made a single purchase! We asked several local people there about good saree shops but we didn’t get a satisfactory answer. So, we changed direction and headed towards a big road instead of wandering in the alleys. There I saw a familiar name, it was one of the names I found on the internet, so we quickly went inside to see their collection. As we sat down to see what they had to show, we were not impressed by their collection at all. At this point, we were hungry and irritated. So, A and I both decided to take a break and go for lunch. It was past mid-day already and we had only bought one saree for A’s grandmom. But nevertheless, we needed a break from the hot Delhi day.

A had looked up a place to have lunch near Lajpat Nagar area over the internet. We wanted to have good lunch and rest for a while before we start looking for saree shops again. So, we went took an auto and went to nearby Defence Colony. At Defence Colony there were a lot of places to eat, but we wanted to go to the famous Colonel’s Kabab. The auto driver took us right at the door of Colonel’s Kabab. We were happy to have found the place with less effort :). As soon as we reached inside, we made our order. We ordered romali roti, my most favorite roti :), mutton kabab, mutton kakab roll, dal makhni, chicken dum biryani and jaljeera drink. The place was quite old and famous. There were pictures on the wall depicting its rich history and the decor was naturally antique. As the food arrived, Jaljeera was very good, the mutton kebab was not as good as expected, romali roti was soft but the best order was chicken dum biryani. All in all, we were satisfied with our lunch and we rested there for a while before we went out to find shops.


After lunch, we headed back to the central market and went to the same wide road to look for more saree shops. This time we found a decent shop and as we started looking for sarees, we noticed that they had fixed process of discount and hence we didn’t need to bargain a lot. At this place we bought most of our sarees and I’m quite satisfied with the purchases we made. It was already 7pm by the time we finished shopping. After this we went to the central market once again and A had the famous pani puri there. As I had throat infection, A didn’t let me eat those delicious pani purees :(, but he said they were the best he ever had, but I had the chance to eat the best chicken momo at Lajpat Nagar Central market, but it was not as good as the Nepali momo :). After that, we went to South Extension market. There again we bought few sarees and it was time for dinner. For dinner, we went to a Bengali vegetarian place, there we had masala dosa and it was yummm!!! We also had some bengoli sweets.

On the final day, we had very less time and a lot of things were still to be bought. At first we went to Karol Bagh to pick our sarees, we snacked on Dosa and Chole Bhature at the local South Indian joint, A said it was the best dosa he ever had. Then we went to South Ex. Mom had asked me to buy special silk saree for her, so we went to Nalli’s to buy silk saree for mom. It has the most serene color of warm pink with some beads work. Then we went to few other saree shops in South Ex. South Ex is more expensive but offers very good quality of authentic sarees, so we bought my wedding saree and reception saree at South Ex. The sarees in South Ex were simply gorgeous, they had the most amazing sarees but I had to stick to my budget and my agenda, so I asked the shopkeeper to show me the specific kind of sarees in my range. Delhi saree shops are very good at salesmanship, they make you feel like a princess asking you to try their most special pieces. I’ve bought few sarees only because it looked adorable when I tried them on.

After the hectic day of shopping, we had local pau bhaji, papri chaat and a glass of Mausambi(sweet lime) juice. Then we went back to Nirman Bihar. As we got down at the metro station, A wanted to try the chicken tandoori one more time before we left; so he bought some chicken and we ate it at the guest house.

But wait, our Delhi experience doesn’t end here. One thing we were discussing on our way to the airport was that we didn’t get much time to explore Delhi food culture. So, when we reached airport, we wanted to try the Indian food counter at the airport as well.We went to Curry Kitchen at the airport food court.

We ordered one North Indian thali and one Hydrabadi Biryani, the north indian thali was really good but the Hydrabadi biryani was a disappointment, you can judge them from the pictures.

We enjoyed the local delhi food a lot.

I bought some sarees with sheer satisfaction, some because I needed to and some out of total urgency. It was a crazy shopping experience and pure indulgence :). I was happy and satisfied to have been able to spend like that on my own, it even made my parents proud. All in all Delhi was a good experience and if I get a chance, I’d like to go there again and visit neighboring cities like Agra and Jaipur.

11 Comments

Filed under Travel